CannaBall Run Supports Veterans Treating War Trauma with Cannabis


This is part 1 of 3 in a series brought to you by our good friends at

Equal Access For All

The 2015 CannaBall Run, sponsored by the Weed for Warriors Project and, began on October 17 at the Santa Monica Pier. Veterans, athletes and supporters gathered at the pier early in the morning to watch the sunrise and raise awareness for Treating War Trauma with Cannabis.

Jose Martinez, a triple amputee, along with TeamMB and veteran brothers from the Weed for Warriors Project, marched 4.20 miles along the coast of Palisades Park to raise awareness of Veterans Treating War Trauma with Cannabis. It was a truly inspirational march, followed by emotional speeches from veterans detailing their ongoing battle with PTSD. They are also battling the executive and legislative branches of the U.S. government for recognition of a safe, natural alternative treatment option to the standard assortment of pills for veterans, regardless of their state of residence.

Large crowds of concerned citizens gathered in support of the cause and gained an inside look into the hearts and minds of our injured veterans. With so many of their fellow fighters lost to suicide and prescription-drug addiction, these military professionals are now fighting for their unalienable right of equal access to cannabis medicine. As federal patients, they require that they be afforded the same rights as veterans in so-called “legal states.”

They, along with a growing number of compassionate doctors, know that cannabis is a superior treatment for war trauma. Many patients find that with access to cannabis, they no longer need as much, if any, opioid medication. They notice that ordinary daily events stop triggering violent alarm responses. They look forward to living life instead of ending it. (These are all what doctors refer to as “good things.”)

While the Cannaball Run is a fun and positive campaign, this is an especially important issue with our nation still at war, because we are losing many more veterans here at home as a result of combat than overseas in actual combat.


The statistics don’t lie: One in five Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans has been diagnosed with PTSD. Every day, on average, 22 veterans commit suicide. In 2012, we lost 6,500 veterans to their own hand—more than were killed in 10 years of the Iraq war. Equally impossible to fathom: Of the 23 states that do have medical cannabis laws, over half exclude PTSD as a…

Source link

Previous ArticleNext Article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *