Research Indicates Cannabinoids Can Reduce Frequency of Migraine Headaches

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Seeking to quantify anecdotal evidence that marijuana’s cannabinoids can drastically reduce the frequency of migraine headaches, a new study was published this month in the journal Pharmacotherapy, and released online by PubMed.gov, which found that cannabinoids could radically diminish the occurrence of migraine headaches for those individuals afflicted with them.

Though the study’s abstract starts off with an interesting caveat, “No clinical trials are currently available that demonstrate the effects of marijuana on patients with migraine headache; however, the potential effects of cannabinoids on serotonin in the central nervous system indicate that marijuana may be a therapeutic alternative,” it seeks to investigate this valid question.

Are cannabinoids helpful in reducing the monthly frequency of migraine headaches?

Shocking few, the answer was yes. Cannabinoids do mitigate migraine headachesat least for some.

After closely studying more than 120 adult migraine sufferers with medical marijuana cards in Colorado, it was discovered that, “Migraine headache frequency decreased from 10.4 to 4.6 headaches per month with the use of medical marijuana. Most patients used more than one form of marijuana and used it daily for prevention of migraine headache.”

Disproving the doubters, the study pointed out cannabinoids potential benefits for those suffering from migraine headaches like this: “Positive effects were reported in 48 patients (39.7%), with the most common effects reported being prevention of migraine headache with decreased frequency of migraine headache (24 patients [19.8%]) and aborted migraine headache (14 patients [11.6%]). Inhaled forms of marijuana were commonly used for acute migraine treatment and were reported to abort migraine headache.”

Learn More About Cannabinoids

The study’s conclusion points out the obvious, “The frequency of migraine headaches was decreased with medical marijuana use. Prospective studies should be conducted to explore a cause-and-effect relationship and the use of different strains, formulations, and doses of marijuana to better understand the effects of medical marijuana on migraine headache treatment and prophylaxis.”

Hey FDA, more research please

(Photo Courtesy of Animalnewyork)



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