Teens Suffering From Low I.Q.? Don’t Blame Pot, According to New Study


As the legalization of marijuana sluggishly takes root in the Land of the Free, a new study is surfacing, dispelling the notion that teens that smoke pot are signing up for a savage ride to the bottom of the IQ scale.

A new study out of the UK is the most recent research to challenge the cruel logic reported in a 2012 Duke University study, which identified chronic pot use in young individuals as one of the primary causes of a diminished IQ.

Dismissing the idea that elevated marijuana consumption can cause chronic stupidity in teenagers and wreak havoc on their school performance, the new British research discovered there’s precious little proof linking low IQs to high marijuana use.

Performed by scientists at the UCL (University College London), the new study examined 2,235 teens that participated in another research project, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.

The welcome results, which were published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology on January 6, 2016, noted that the participants – all young adults – had their IQs tested at ages 8 and 15. Of which, approximately 25 percent said they’d smoked weed at least one time, and 3.3 percent had admitted to using marijuana at least 50 times.

Teens Suffering From Low I.Q.? Don’t Blame Pot, According to New Study

While some youthful pot smokers did score lower on their IQ test and educational scores, there was scant evidence that marijuana use directly affected either.

The scores from the intelligence quotient test showed adolescence that used marijuana more than 50 times were 0.1 point lower than the teenagers who never fired up.

The notion that cannabis use itself is causally related to lower IQ and poorer educational performance was not supported in this large teenage sample.” According to the study’s lead author, Claire Mokrysz.

The study concluded:

There is much debate about the impact of adolescent cannabis use on intellectual and educational outcomes … These findings suggest that adolescent cannabis use is not associated with IQ or educational performance once adjustment is made for potential confounds, in particular adolescent cigarette use. Modest cannabis use in teenagers may have less cognitive impact than epidemiological surveys of older cohorts have previously suggested.

Good to know…

Source link

Previous ArticleNext Article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *